All posts filed under: Art

Molas: Kuna Textiles of Panama

I just returned from Costa Rica. As usual, I was on a hunt to satisfy my textile obsession. While the indigenous communities of Costa Rica are not known for textile production, I managed to discover a group that is, just over the border in Panama. The Kuna Indians, a tribal community occupying the San Blas islands off the Eastern coast of Panama are recognized for their colorful geometric cotton panels referred to as Molas. The elaborate, artistic textiles are created utilizing a reverse appliqué technique applied to several layers of different color cloth, through which designs are carved. Molas have become a part of the traditional dress of the Kuna women. They are attached to the front of blouses and skirts as a form of artistic expression and a celebration of the culture. Advertisements

The Human Kaleidoscope

Ok Go collaborated with the renowned experimental dance company, Pilobolus for their latest video All is Not Lost. Known for pushing the boundaries in the realm of music videos, Ok Go has taken it step further to produce a piece of work that is more a digital masterpiece than a music video. With a little help from Google Chrome and their master programmers, synchronized dancers take shape as a human kaleidoscope. View the full experience through your Google Chrome browser here www.allisnotlo.st

The Eye of the Sahara

What seems to resemble an abstract painting is actually the eye of the Sahara desert photographed from above. The 31 mile wide bulls-eye referred to as the Richat Structure is believed to have been formed by erosion. The abstract beauty found in nature continuously astounds me. More often than not, we get so wrapped in our day to day lives that don’t realize the beauty of our surroundings that is right in front of us. via But Does it Float

Luis Mallo – Beyond Barriers

I stumbled upon “In Camera” the work of photographer Luis Mallo and found myself intrigued by his unconventional compositions. I admit I tend to be drawn to the abstract, but there is something more to his photographs. They are shot through obstructions such as fences and walls while unexpectedly providing clarity and interest to what lies beyond the barriers. They offer an interesting balance of perspective between the foreground and background.

Mbuti Barkcloth Paintings

Deep within the Ituri Rainforest of the Northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, formerly Zaire  lies the habitat of the Mbuti people, one of the last hunter-gatherer cultures in the world. This distinctive nomadic society thrives solely off the rich, natural environment of their surroundings. The Mbuti are bamiki bandura, “children of the forest.” Their values are deeply rooted in spiritual and symbolic tradition expressed through song and dance. The barkcloths are produced as ritual dress for festivals, celebrations and rites of passage, including wedding and funeral ceremonies. The elaborate art of the barkcloth is a social activity, and Mbuti learn how to make barkcloth from an early age. The barkcloth canvas is obtained by the men, sourced from the inner bark of about six different species of trees. It is pounded with an ivory or wood mallet to produce a subtle textured and supple fibrous canvas composed of various natural shades of white, tan or reddish brown. The women prepare the dyes and paints from a variety of roots, fruits and leaves which they collect from the forest. The paint is applied with twigs, twine or fingers. The Mbuti barkcloth paintings reflect their world. They are abstract expressions of the forest from …

Carole Waller

I was browsing through my archives of textile magazine Selvedge and discovered UK  artist Carole Waller .  She fuses color, light, textiles, glass, enamel and paint with either figurative or site specific imagery to make paintings which become glass installations, clothing, textile hangings, or live projects and collaborations. So brilliant!