All posts filed under: Design

Mosaic Wood Art by Richard Pearse

Richard Pearse is a New Zealand-based artist that lives and works out of a shed in Patea, South Taranaki. He produces mosaic, artistic compositions made from recycled wood scraps. Intricately cut and painted, the pieces are glued together to form colorful, graphic and geometric patterns, while embracing the natural beauty and textural variations of the wood.

Markus Linnenbrink’s World of Stripes

Marcus Linnenbrink, a German born brooklyn based artist is known for his striking works of art composed of drippy, vivid streaks of color. His work ranges from the floors, ceiling, and walls of site-specific instillations to paintings and sculptures. Linnenbrink utilizes a special mix of dry pigment and water to create the drippy nature of the painted lines for which his work is best known. His impressive use of color and linear repetition tends to encapsulate the viewer manipulating the perspective of the interiors of the environment in which it exists. via Collosal Art & Design  

Rick Owens’ “Magic Mountain” Furniture Exhibition in St. Moritz

Far off in the magical land of Samedan, a picturesque village 6 km northeast of St. Moritz, Rick Owens has brought his fantasy world to life in the Chesa Planta house. Built in 1595, the house exists today as a museum restored to convey the look of an 18th century Engadin aristocratic home. On January 28th the museum debuted “Magic Mountain,”  an exhibiton composed of  Owens’ exquisite artisanal furniture designs. The collection, post-modern and minimalistic, is  synonymous with his distinctive design philosophy evoking a sense of goth meets luxury. Some of the highlights include bone chairs with stag antler backs, an oversized alabaster bed that becomes translucent in the sun, and a petrified wood sofa. via V Magazine

The Equus collection by Lladró

Lately I have been gravitating towards eclectic tabletop collections that verge the unconventional. I seek out unique pieces that make a statement, applying a collectors mindset to the art of the table. While browsing Fivestory, the new luxury concept boutique on the Upper East Side, I discovered Lladro’s Equus collection designed by Bodo Sperlein. Inspired by the beauty and elegance of the physique of horses, the collection repurposes horse heads and legs from old Lladro figurines to accent cups and bowls. By placing the elements in an unconventional context, Sperlein aimed to entice the viewers curiousity while drawing attention to the unmistakable craftsmanship of Lladro porcelain. Shop the collection at Artedona

Golden Spider Silk at the V&A

One of the most interesting new additions to London’s prestigious Victoria & Albert museum is a exhibition showcasing the world’s largest pieces of cloth made from spider silk. On display is an elaborate embroidered cape and a 4 meter long scarf. The silk used to produce these items came from over one million female golden orb weaver spiders collected from the highlands of Madagascar. Everyday for seven years, 80 people collected wild spiders to produce enough silk to weave these striking pieces.  Not to worry, the spiders are kept safe. They are retained for about 12 hours, just enough time to extract the silk, and then they are returned to their natural environment. The display will run until June 5, 2012. via BBC

Molas: Kuna Textiles of Panama

I just returned from Costa Rica. As usual, I was on a hunt to satisfy my textile obsession. While the indigenous communities of Costa Rica are not known for textile production, I managed to discover a group that is, just over the border in Panama. The Kuna Indians, a tribal community occupying the San Blas islands off the Eastern coast of Panama are recognized for their colorful geometric cotton panels referred to as Molas. The elaborate, artistic textiles are created utilizing a reverse appliqué technique applied to several layers of different color cloth, through which designs are carved. Molas have become a part of the traditional dress of the Kuna women. They are attached to the front of blouses and skirts as a form of artistic expression and a celebration of the culture.

Wharton Esherick

Wharton Esherick, known for his exquisite mid-century designs was a woodworker that created expressionistic furniture and interiors. He focused on the shape of his creations, treating each piece as a unique sculpture. He created curvilinear free-form designs that elicited fluid movement and emotion. His approach garnered him significant recognition for bridging the gap between art and craft. His wooden art spans a fifty year period from 1920 until his death in 1970. Though, it was not until around 1930, when he was in his 40’s that his emphasis turned to furniture design. He spent his early years painting Cubist and Impressionist landscapes and portraits, as well as, designing prints, posters and theater sets. Wharton Esherick has been called the link between the Arts and Crafts Movement and the revival of furniture making following World War II. His legacy lies as the dean of American craftsmen and the pioneer of the Studio Furniture Movement where he was joined by George Nakashima, Sam Maloof, James Krenov, Tage Frid, and later, Wendell Castle. His hilltop studio/residence, now a National Historic Landmark for …